Tag Twitter

The Hidden World of Experience Design

UK blogger and UX designer Peter Smart’s excellent post proposing an industry-wide rethink of the humble boarding pass is a perfect example of what is increasingly referred to as ‘experience design’.

There is no shortage of real-life examples of products and services we encounter every day that suck. Where product teams (which include designers) bring value to the companies we work for is in evaluating our products based on the experience of using them (see eat your own dog food) and working to improve the suck factors.

Experience design goes beyond typical product design by taking a broader view of how using the product makes you feel – sounds a little airy-fairy I know – but think about the last time you purchased something from an Apple store. Do you remember how it felt to walk out of a packed store with your purchase without wasting any time lining up at the cash register? By rethinking the retail experience by providing floor staff with handheld checkout terminals, Apple substantively changed how customers feel about the Apple store experience.

This is not the first time airline boarding passes have been called out for a redesign, but Peter Smart puts the key focus on usability and experience, not about simply cleaning up the design. Smart’s proposal also works within some very practical constraints: the boarding pass is still the same standard size and information is still printed in black ink. The little design touches – adding the destination weather at arrival time and leveraging the existing perforation so the boarding pass fits perfectly in a passport with just the Flight number and departure gate showing – those are the clever bits that make all the difference.

PeterSmartBP_passfold

Jack Dorsey understands experience design. The co-founder of Twitter and CEO of payment startup Square recently spoke in detail about the mission of Square: not just to make payments easier, but to reinvent the experience of digital payments.

The biggest challenge with experience design is that we need to uncover parts of the customer experience that are often hidden – because we take them for granted. Status quo is the enabler of poor experience design. Boarding passes haven’t changed much in decades, and they function reasonably well. But if you fly often enough, you might re-imagine how a better boarding pass could make the experience better. Dorsey talks about coming at the experience design of Square from the perspective of a consumer, not a merchant, despite merchants being Square’s direct customers. Putting a lot of thought into what many would treat as an afterthought – the payment receipt – shows a commitment  to evaluate every customer touchpoint and make improvements that contribute to the overall experience.

As a digital product team we arguably have complete control over customer experience on the digital side of the business. At the Globe and Mail, where I work, we have roughly a million unique visitors each day navigating our web site on any number of devices, using one of our native apps, or signing up for a subscription service online. Every screen, menu and click is part of the overall Globe experience. Every detail is the result of the decisions we make, and collectively that defines the experience.

So sweat the small stuff. Details matter. Constantly evaluate every customer  interaction point, and rank improvements on a PICK chart. Talk to you customers regularly to understand their hassle maps. Incorporate grey label customer feedback tools like UserVoice or GetSatisfaction right into your digital products – believe me they will be a hundred times better, faster and cheaper than anything you could build yourself. I’m also a fan of Net Promoter as a simple, trackable metric of customer satisfaction – it will tell you if you are moving the needle in the right direction and give you verbatim customer feedback you might otherwise miss.

Experience design isn’t an entirely new concept – in some ways it’s no more than a new coat of paint on the old adage about the customer always being right. But with better tools to understand the customer experience and the ability to quickly deliver iterative improvement a on digital products, our ability to respond has never been better.

Product Idea: Twitter Reader

One of my favourite IFTTT recipes was to add any tweet that I favourited to Instapaper. Not only was it a good way to keep track of interesting reads, it also ensured I always had a good selection of Instapaper content to read whenever I was offline.

That ended when Twitter stopped support for IFTTT a year or so ago, but I never stopped thinking about how useful that setup was.

But there’s no reason Twitter couldn’t provide the same functionality within their native apps. The UX would be simple and users would understand it immediately. Every time you favorite a tweet, the article content is downloaded in the background and added to your ‘Twitter reader’ list, and stored offline (and synched across devices) an efficient format. Any time you’re offline, or want to catch up on your reading, tap the reader icon in your twitter app and pick something to read. Of course, browsing the reading lists of people you follow would be a big part of it, and would provide a second window for retweets.

Twitter could easily monetize this by selling ads against the content in their reader too – why let Flipboard have all the fun?